Gluteus Maximus



(Sacral Portion*)

Origin: The medial crest of the ilium, the inferior lateral angle of the sacrum, the aponeurosis of the erector spinae muscle, the sacro-tuberous ligament, the side of the coccyx and the fascia covering the gluteus medius.

Insertion: The back of the femur shaft -- the linea aspera and the fascia lata.

Located: Palpated inferior and immediately lateral to the inferior lateral angle of the sacrum, on either side of the sacral apex (superior to the apex).  The fingers (the thumbs may be used here because of tissue density) are rolled (a light smooth pressure) over the surface of the gluteus maximus near its origin, angling along the plane of the inferior lateral angle, approxfmately half an inch to an inch from the sacrum.

Listing Involvement: The gluteus maximus works to correct the posterior sacrum. The gluteus maximus is also working for correction of the deviated sacral "angle," as the inferiorly misaligned sacrum shifts the "angle" closer toward the median line. Therefore, the working gluteus maximus must be interpreted in combination with the entire sacral complex and thus establish the proper listing of the misalignment.  Therefore, the working gluteus maximus must be interpreted in combination with the entire sacral complex and thus establish the proper listing of the misalignment.

Workirig Sensation: The working gluteus maximus is perhaps the most obvious muscle to interpret within this analysis, as it rises from a broad origin (even the sacral "portion" is a wide band) and demonstrates a sinewy tension.

* While only a portion of the actual anatomical origin attaches to the sacrum, the large, coursely-grained fibers of the gluteus maximus can act relatively "independent" of one another.